OAP - The Ozone Action Partnership
Ozone Action Days

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What is an ozone action day?


The Ozone Action Partnership has arranged for meteorologists from TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) to forecast ozone levels during ozone season (May through September).  If the 8-hour average ozone concentration is predicted to be higher than 85 parts per billion, an ozone action day is called for the next day. In the chart below, a specific color has been assigned to each category. For example, red means unhealthy conditions and purple means very unhealthy conditions. 

Air Quality Index
Air Quality

8 hour standard parts per billion (ppb)

Protect Your Health
Good 0 - 64 No health impacts are expected when air quality is in this range.
Moderate 65 - 84 Unusually sensitive people should consider limiting prolonged outdoor exertion.
Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups 85 - 104 Active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should limit prolonged outdoor exertion.
Unhealthy 105 - 124 Active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should avoid prolonged outdoor exertion; everyone else, especially children, should limit prolonged outdoor exertion.
Very Unhealthy (Alert) >125 Active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should avoid all outdoor exertion; everyone else, especially children, should limit prolonged outdoor exertion.
 

How will you know if an ozone action day has been called?
The local media will include the forecast as part of their evening news the day before ozone levels are predicted to be high. You can also check EPAs website everyday after 4:00 p.m., and if your employer is an active partner in the Ozone Action Partnership, you may receive word from your management.

What is tomorrow's forecast?

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